Summary

We spent 5.9 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what training geeks think:

6 reasons to buy

  • The overwhelming majority of wearers love how comfortable the HOVR Apex feels from the start.
  • Both experts and users speak well of the HOVR midsole. It does an excellent job cushioning the foot during jumps.
  • Most gym-goers are happy with the heel stability the shoe offers for squats and other strength-training activities.
  • More than a few customers nod to its sturdy and durable construction.
  • An avid CrossFitter takes note of the trainer’s high lateral stability.
  • The uncustomary color choices make it an eye-catching option from UA.

2 reasons not to buy

  • Many people have been baffled by the shoe’s bulky design, which makes it uncomfortable for agile workouts and runs. Its proportions are comparable to those of ‘dad shoes.’
  • Multiple buyers have been put off by its hefty price tag.  

Bottom line

The HOVR Apex from Under Armour has become the odd one in the brand’s lineup. While its cushioning and stability work excellently for high-impact and strength exercises, the shoe’s padded out construction makes it unsuitable for the fast-paced workout sessions.

It is also priced at the higher end of the spectrum, along with the more functional flagship cross-trainers. However, many people still choose the UA HOVR Apex for the comfort and underfoot support it delivers.

Facts

Reviews from around the internet

Expert reviews:

User reviews:

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Video reviews and unboxing

The HOVR Apex was designed for those who aim towards versatility in their workout plans. It employs the HOVR cushioning for explosive jumps and agility training but is also equipped with a sturdy reinforcement for stable weight training.

This model was released together with the UA HOVR Rise trainer. Both use the brand’s most advanced HOVR cushioning technology, but the Apex was given more stability for weightlifting. It could explain why the shoe comes at a 40$ higher price tag than the Rise.

Taking after the successful Tribase Reign shoe, the brand employs the Tribase outsole in the HOVR Apex as well. This design has been extensively praised for its traction and stability.

Because it is made up of three parts, it gives varying levels of traction and ground contact, depending on the shoe section. The heel and midfoot have a flat structure, maximizing the foot’s contact area with the floor. It helps the wearer feel more stable when lifting heavier weights. The forefoot, on the other hand, features protruding lugs that grip into the ground to prevent slippage during agile movements.

At the same time, the Tribase outsole does not compromise flexibility. According to the brand, this unit is capable of both upwards and downwards pliability. When it bends upwards, the shoe promotes natural foot flexion, and when it flexes downwards, it helps the foot grip the ground for stability.

One of the shoe’s major highlights is, of course, the HOVR cushioning. It also happens to be the brand’s most progressive technology which has also been used in the Project Rock 2, one of UA’s in-demand trainers.

The HOVR is claimed to provide a ‘zero-gravity’ underfoot experience which accommodates jumping exercises while offering impact protection. To make sure the foam doesn’t lose its shape, it’s been encased in a compression mesh Energy Web. It contains the HOVR, making sure that the energy doesn’t get dissipated and is returned directly to the wearer.

The base layer of the shoe’s upper is made of mesh fabric. It is a lightweight material that is meant to feel like a feather on the foot. It also features visible ventilation pores that allow air to pass through and keep the foot fresh.

Because the forefoot area is especially prone to abrasion during intensive workouts, it has been reinforced with a 3D print. It is made of a solid TPU material, which is known for its abrasion-resistant qualities.

A lot of attention has been given to the heel area of the HOVR Apex. It equips a layered support system made of sturdy synthetic compounds. They create borders on both sides of the foot to keep it steady during side-to-side movements. They also help to lock down the rearfoot when it comes to squatting with heavy loads.

Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick is a powerlifter who believes cardio comes in the form of more heavy ass squats. Based on over 1.5 million lifts done at competitions, his PRs place him as an elite level powerlifter. His PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Forbes, Bodybuilding.com, Elite Daily and the like. Collaborating along the way with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.

nick@runrepeat.com