Who should buy the Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top

This Converse shoe is a sneaker-boot hybrid whose high-top construction and chunkiness give a burst of self-confidence. Add this to your to-buy list if:

  • You need neutral-colored shoes that work incredibly well with jeans, sweatpants, and shorts.
  • Your collection has space for high-cut shoes that give a springy ride for longer.
  • Kicks that look and feel sturdy are what you're after.

 Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top buy

Who should not buy it

If you dislike high-tops that get dirty easily, skip the featured sneaker and turn to the Nike Air Force 1 07 High instead. Also, consider the Manoa from Nike if you like venturing into the rougher parts of the city.

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Plush from top to bottom

Many reviewers describe the Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top as "comfortable." They also say that the shoe's incredible underfoot cushioning is a huge contributor to its comfort level.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top comf

Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top: Built to last

Many sneakerheads commend this unique version of the Chuck Taylor All Star for its remarkable durability.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top dura

Conversation starter

Wearers are convinced that the All Star Lugged High Top is a platform shoe that attracts a lot of compliments. It is, after all, among the most stylish kicks they've ever owned.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top start

Beware the mud

Based on a couple of reviews, the All Star Lugged High Top gets smudged easily, particularly its sole unit.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top smudge

The All Star Lugged High Top's fantastic collar

Reviewers-slash-testers praise this Adidas shoe for having more than enough ankle support.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top ankle

Needs longer shoestrings

One reviewer finds the laces of this piece too short, leaving a space that's only enough to tie a small bow.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top lace

The Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top in history

The Chuck Taylor All Star has been around for a very long time. This timeless design was the top basketball sneaker until the 1960s. When Chuck Taylor died, its popularity on the basketball court decreased. However, it was able to cross cultures and has become a famous street style sneaker among the kids in the yards, artists, and musicians. It also successfully paved its way to pop culture. 

From then until today, what you wear defines different cultures, and the brand has been redefining it with you. Whether on the court or in the streets, the Chuck Taylor All Star remains iconic. A market staple for a long time, the Chuck Taylor All Star has been released in various versions, different colorways, and collaborative editions.

Among the many iterations of the famous Chuck Taylor All-Star is the Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top, which was released with a familiar but completely different silhouette. This model inherited Chuck Taylor features that everyone knows and loves. The classic high-top Chuck Taylor All Star comes with an updated chunky sole with deep lugs, which not only adds height to its wearers, but it also provides superior grip on a variety of surfaces.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top histo

Facts / Specs

Style: Platform, Retro, Chunky, Sneakerboots
Top: High
Inspired from: Basketball
Collection: Converse Chuck Taylor All Star
Closure: Laces
Material: Canvas, Rubber Sole, EVA / Fabric
Season: Spring, Summer, Fall

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Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lugged High Top unboxing and on-feet videos

Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.