Summary

We spent 10.1 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what basketball players think:

6 reasons to buy

  • The lightweight materials of the Nike Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 are loved by many wearers because they are comfortable and flexible.
  • The thickness of the Zoom units gets praises from plenty of buyers because it delivers good impact protection and responsiveness.
  • The traction of the Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 delivers a good court grip and does not need frequent wiping.
  • At least a couple of buyers are happy that these signature shoes from Kobe Bryant’s series has extra durable rubber (XDR) in some regions.
  • A number of sneaker fanatics appreciate that Nike released an affordable Kobe signature shoe.
  • The mesh upper provides continuous airflow to the foot, some wearers observe.

5 reasons not to buy

  • A small number of wearers criticize the design of the shoe as unrevolutionary.
  • The shoe needs weeks of break-in time, claim a few buyers.
  • Some users mention that the shoe is not for outdoor plays.
  • A great number of buyers complain that the shoe at $120 is already too expensive for a budget model. It is almost as pricey as the 2018 Nike Kobe AD.
  • If the shoelaces are not tied tight enough, a handful of wearers claim they experience foot slippage.

Bottom line

The Nike Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 is an ordinary basketball shoe. The shoe model is reliable for indoor hoops but it is without much support. The cushioning setup of the shoe is helpful to players who need impact absorption from rebounds and jumps. This shoe is also a match with casual wearers who love a simple design and colorway.

Facts

Reviews from around the internet

Expert reviews:

Video reviews and unboxing

The Nike Venomenon series is added to the Kobe basketball shoes list as a line of budget models. It was originally designed as an outdoor basketball sneaker for non-stateside wearers. Currently, stateside buyers can cop these affordable Kobe sneakers.

The Nike Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 is equipped with Phylon and two Zoom units. This setup provides enough responsiveness and impact protection. The traction has a good grip on court floors. The upper is a combination of mesh for breathability and fuse for durability.

Some wearers prefer a more recent low-top sneakers. Recommendations are the signature shoes of Clyde Frazier from Puma Hoops, and Paul George’s third Nike basketball shoe.

Cushion. The midsole of the Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 has full-length Phylon with Zoom technology. The Zoom unit at the forefoot is bottom-loaded to give a  low-to-the-ground feel with adequate responsiveness. The Zoom unit at the heel absorbs impact upon landing.

Traction. The outsole of the Nike Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 has an extra durable rubber (XDR) on Asian releases. For the stateside release, Nike uses a regular rubber compound. Unless it has an XDR outsole, the shoe is designed to be used indoors. The traction is said to have a snake skin pattern. It bites indoor court floors well and minimal wiping is advised.

Length and Width. Nike manufactures and designs shoes in the standard widths and lengths. As for the Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6, testers with wider feet claim the shoe fits them comfortably like a glove. New buyers with narrow to normal feet are advised to fit the shoe first before buying.

Lockdown. The Nike Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 utilizes simple and flat shoelaces for lockdown. The tongue and inner side of the upper have an ample amount of foam padding to give the ankle a comfortable hug and support.

The upper of the Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 is made of tightly woven mesh for breathability. Certain areas of the shoe such as the toe cap and midfoot area have fuse overlays for durability. From the midfoot to the heel, the molded rubber provides stability to the wearer. The midsole has a midfoot shank for a smooth heel-to-toe transition.

The Nike Zoom Kobe Venomenon 6 is a low-top shoe with a very simple design. It has a half-bootie construction for easy putting on and removal. Swoosh logos are found on the forefoot, medial side, and insole of the shoe. To mark the shoe model as part of Kobe’s budget series, his logos are found on the tongue and heel counter. A rope pull tab is strategically placed to aid in putting the shoe in.

Author
Dimitrije Curcic
Dimitrije Curcic

Dimitrije Curcic has been playing basketball for over 22 years. Like Manu Ginobili, he’s a left-hander whose moves led him to a better career-shooting percentage than the Argentine himself. After playing professionally for 10 years, Dimitrije moved to coaching for two seasons before he became a basketball statistician for StatScore, and FanSided contributor for the San Antonio Spurs. Dimitrije loves to tell hoop stories through numbers and graphics and has been featured on Fansided, FiveThirtyEight, Eurohoops, and TalkBasket among the others.

dimitrije@runrepeat.com