Summary

We spent 8.7 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what training geeks think:

6 reasons to buy

  • A vast majority of buyers speak highly of the shoe’s comfortable feel.
  • Plenty of gym-goers are happy with the support it provides for HIIT and strength training.
  • The trainer’s design and color options make it a stylish addition to any workout outfit, according to most buyers.
  • Multiple wearers praise the shoe as a lightweight option for training.
  • Many users appreciate the wide strap for keeping the foot secure without being too tight. It also helps to skip niggling with laces.
  • A few reviews mention that the outsole does a good job gripping the gym floor.

2 reasons not to buy

  • More than a few purchasers warn that this trainer is a bad option for overpronators as it forces the foot to roll inwards.
  • One person reports that it tends to be squeaky on hard surfaces, wooden floors in particular.

Bottom line

Many buyers have been pleasantly surprised with the combination of comfort and style in the In-Season TR 9. This ladies’ trainer from Nike feels light on the foot and yet provides ample support when it comes to tough exercises. The addition of a gore strap also contributes to the sure-footed experience.

For more, check our guide to the best training shoes

Facts

Reviews from around the internet

User reviews:

SportsShoes, REI and 19 other shops don't have user reviews

The 9th iteration of the In-Season TR line strays very far from its predecessors in terms of style and technologies.

This time around, Nike employs a dual-density Renew midsole which has previously been used in some of the brand’s running shoes. It is meant to make the trainer more efficient for workout sessions that involve cardio, running, and light to moderate weightlifting. 

Another notable feature is the wide gore strap at the midfoot. Placed on top of the laces, it serves to hold the foot steady throughout the most intense lateral movements.

At the same time, this In-Season trainer remains one of the most lightweight training shoe options for ladies.

There is no dedicated full-length outsole in the In-Season TR 9. This is one of the key contributing factors to the shoe’s lightweight nature. Instead, the trainer relies on the targeted rubber pods which add durability and grip where they are most needed.

The entire platform features a recessed tread pattern that keeps the surface flat. It helps to create a more flat ground contact to promote stability for weightlifting.

At first glance, it may seem like the shoe has a very thick sole unit. But in reality, the foot sits rather close to the ground. It’s the raised side panels that make the midsole seem so big. They extend upwards, creating borders on both sides. Such construction offers foot containment during lateral movements.

The Nike Renew serves as the main cushioning component in the In-Season TR 9. It is a dual-density material that fuses a responsive foam for bouncy jumps and a firmer foam for stability. It also makes the trainer a bit more friendly for short runs.

The Comfort Footbed puts a finishing touch to the shoe’s underfoot padding. This memory foam sockliner adjusts to the individual’s foot shape for extra comfort.

The entire upper of the shoe is wrapped in a breathable mesh fabric. It creates a soft coverage for the foot while making sure the foot chamber stays aerated.

The 9th version of the In-Season TR is equipped with a large midfoot strap. Made of an elastic gore material, it remains stiff when support is required but also stretches with the foot when necessary (for example, when the shoe is being put on). That way it helps to deliver a more adaptive foot containment.

The lightly padded tongue and collar and an extended heel apex also contribute to a secure lockdown. They hug the ankle area to prevent the footwear from slipping off.

Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick is a powerlifter who believes cardio comes in the form of more heavy ass squats. Based on over 1.5 million lifts done at competitions, his PRs place him as an elite level powerlifter. His PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Forbes, Bodybuilding.com, Elite Daily and the like. Collaborating along the way with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.

nick@runrepeat.com