Summary

We spent 8.8 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what basketball players think:

8 reasons to buy

  • The full-length Air cushioning might have worked as intended because most testers claim that the Air Jordan 7 Low absorbs impact well.
  • The leather upper of these Air Jordan basketball sneakers are durable and comfortable, observe a good number of users. It is as comfortable as its predecessor the 6th Air Jordan shoe model.
  • Many buyers say that the Air Jordan 7 Low is surprisingly affordable.
  • A lot of shoppers rave about the design of these low-top Air Jordan basketball shoes. They say they will purchase all three colorways as a collection.
  • The traction pattern performs beastly on any court surface according to the majority of wearers.
  • A lot of testers mention that the signature shoe is true-to-size.
  • The Air Jordan 7 Low are beautifully made, notice a couple of buyers. They say that there are no visible glue stains on the shoe. The creation is as good as the Air Jordan 1 high-top sneaker.
  • One reviewer claims that these low-top basketball sneakers look great with sweats or pants.

3 reasons not to buy

  • Some reviewers think that the colorways of the Air Jordan 7 Low are for the females.  
  • These Air Jordan sneakers for basketball lack ventilation, say a handful of wearers.
  • A small number of buyers complain that the leather upper creases easily.

Bottom line

With plenty of different basketball shoes on the market, the Air Jordan 7 Low will not be the top choice performance- and price-wise. Though the AJ 7 Low is a great performer, its limited release makes it more fit to become a collector’s item. It is really hard to tell when a huge number of pairs will be available in stores. If by any chance you get to see this model, cop immediately.

Facts

The Air Jordan 7 Low first surfaced in February 2008, but it was not an official release and the shoe never hit the stores. Its public debut was on September 27, 2018. Retail starts at $140.

These low-top basketball shoes are reported to have the same full-length Air unit for cushioning. As a Jordan shoe trademark, the Air Jordan 7 is one of the most comfortable model of the brand. It also comes with the same leather upper and modified traction pattern.

Cushion. The responsiveness of the Air Jordan 7 Low comes from the full-length Air unit embedded in its Phylon midsole. The Air technology is a durable, lightweight, and pressurized bag. Upon impact, it compresses and delivers energy return as it goes back to its original shape and volume. The midsole is wrapped with polyurethane for durability.

Traction. The Air Jordan 7 Low comes with a modified traction pattern in a solid outsole rubber. On dusty courts, minimal wiping is needed to maintain its grip

Length and Width. The Air Jordan 7 Low is reportedly true to size. Wide-footers better fit the shoe prior to purchase.

Lockdown. The Air Jordan 7 Low’s glove-like fit is primarily because of the neoprene inner cleatie. To secure the foot, the signature shoe uses an adjustable tongue and traditional lacing system.

The upper of the Air Jordan 7 Low is a combination of leather and nubuck. The combination makes the upper durable and flexible. Perforations are seen in the tongue and sides of the shoe for breathability.

The Air Jordan 7 Low comes in attractive colorways that make it great not only on the court but also off it. The “JORDAN” callout is boldly printed on the colorful tongue. The Jordan logo is found in the outsole’s heel area. Michael Jordan’s jersey number 23 is diagonally placed on the heel panel.

The 2018 release of the Air Jordan 7 Low only brought three colorways. The two basic colorways are the Bright Concord and Taxi.

Air Jordan 7 Low Bordeaux

The Bordeaux colorway mimics the original Air Jordan 7. It features a black upper with light graphite, midnight fog, and bordeaux color scheme.

Author
Dimitrije Curcic
Dimitrije Curcic

Dimitrije Curcic has been playing basketball for over 22 years. Like Manu Ginobili, he’s a left-hander whose moves led him to a better career-shooting percentage than the Argentine himself. After playing professionally for 10 years, Dimitrije moved to coaching for two seasons before he became a basketball statistician for StatScore, and FanSided contributor for the San Antonio Spurs. Dimitrije loves to tell hoop stories through numbers and graphics and has been featured on Fansided, FiveThirtyEight, Eurohoops, and TalkBasket among the others.

dimitrije@runrepeat.com