Summary

We spent 9.2 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what basketball players think:

5 reasons to buy

  • Reviewers are unanimous in saying that the Air Jordan 33 SE has great traction on indoor dust-free courts.
  • All who made video reviews say that this shoe from the Jordan Brand fits really nice.
  • At least two expert reviewers say that the upper materials of these low-top basketball shoes get the job done.
  • The shoe’s cushioning system is designed to suit faster players who love court feel. It has Zoom Air in the forefoot and a hex Zoom unit at the heel. These units are embedded in a phylon carrier.
  • The Air Jordan 33 SE looks a bit more streamlined than the regular AJ 33.

1 reasons not to buy

  • While the Air Jordan 33 Low fits nice, it’s a bit challenging to put on and take off because of how the opening is designed. One even said that the FastFit technology that this shoe has is not aptly named.

Bottom line

The Special Edition Air Jordan 33 is supposed to be a refined version of the original Air Jordan 33.  But the refinement has some hits as well as misses. While the fit is a hit, the ease in wearing (or lack thereof) is not. There are reports that the foot literally has to be forced into the shoe. Traction is good, but only on indoor courts. The pattern on the outsole is easily silenced by dust so outdoor play is not a good idea. While the cushioning is good, there are a number of better options.

Facts

Reviews from around the internet

Expert reviews:

Video reviews and unboxing

Also known as the Air Jordan 33 Low, the special edition AJ 33 bears significant improvements to the regular Air Jordan 33. It still features the FastFit system but is now missing the adjustable laces on the midfoot. It has a full-length phylon carrier with Zoom Air in the forefoot and a hex Zoom unit in the heel. This cushioning setup suits faster players really well because of the responsiveness and court feel that it provides.

For traction, the shoe has a translucent rubber outsole that features the exact same pattern as the regular Air Jordan 33.

Cushion. The Air Jordan 33 Special Edition has a phylon midsole. It has a hexagonal Zoom unit at the heel and a highly responsive Zoom Air in the forefoot. This setup affords the wearer high levels of responsiveness and court feel. As such, this shoe is said to be better suited to faster players.  

Traction. The outsole of the Air Jordan 33 Low is made of translucent rubber. For traction, it features a pattern that is very similar to what is seen on the AJ 33, which is reported to have really good traction especially on dust-free indoor courts.

Length and Width. There are only a few reviews available, but they are one in saying that this shoe runs a bit long and is quite narrow. In fact, its width makes it a little bit challenging to wear and remove. New buyers are advised to go at least one size higher, especially if they have wider-than-usual feet. It will be better if they are able to try the shoe on in-store before they make their purchase online or through any other platform.

Lockdown. The shoe is equipped with the FastFit system that makes use of nylon cables and ribbons in order to achieve a nice snug fit.

The upper of the AJ 33 Low is made of knit textile with synthetic overlays for durablity. Underneath the textile are nylon ribbons and cables. These elements comprise the shoe’s FastFit system, which contributes greatly to a great lockdown.

It can be said that the SE is the more streamlined version of the AJ 33. While the original has flaps and some exposed cables, the AJ 33 SE or Air Jordan 33 Low covers these elements with a very soft and thin textile. This has synthetic overlays in high-wear areas to further protect the foot.

The Air Jordan 33 SE comes in the following colors:

  • Black/Cement
  • Cool Grey/Volt
  • Royal Blue/Orange
Author
Dimitrije Curcic
Dimitrije Curcic

Dimitrije Curcic has been playing basketball for over 22 years. Like Manu Ginobili, he’s a left-hander whose moves led him to a better career-shooting percentage than the Argentine himself. After playing professionally for 10 years, Dimitrije moved to coaching for two seasons before he became a basketball statistician for StatScore, and FanSided contributor for the San Antonio Spurs. Dimitrije loves to tell hoop stories through numbers and graphics and has been featured on Fansided, FiveThirtyEight, Eurohoops, and TalkBasket among the others.

dimitrije@runrepeat.com