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Asics HyperGel KAN has just been released by Asics. Our experts are working on a detailed review. Please, come back later.

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Facts

Terrain: Road
Arch support: Neutral
Weight: Men: 10.7oz | Women: 8.8oz
Heel to toe drop: Men: 8mm | Women: 8mm
Pronation: Neutral Pronation
Arch type: High arch
Use: Jogging
Features: Slip-on | High-top
Strike Pattern: Midfoot strike
Distance: Daily running | Long distance | Marathon
Heel height: Men: 18mm | Women: 17mm
Forefoot height: Men: 10mm | Women: 9mm
Brand: Asics
Type: Heavy | Big guy | Low drop
Width: Men: Normal | Women: Normal
Price: $150
Colorways: Black, Grey, White
Size
Small True to size Large
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  • First look | Asics

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  • The Asics HyperGel KAN is a running shoe that’s designed for the roads. It makes use of a fashion-forward design to accommodate those who desire style to go along with their functional footwear. A knitted upper provides a smooth and flexible coverage, and it’s supported by an internal sleeve that resembles the structure of a sock.
  • HyperGEL™ mixes full-length eTPU with the bead version of the proprietary GEL® shock-attenuating technology. The amalgamation of these features ensures consistent cushioning that isn’t weighed down. A rubber exterior protects the platform and saves it from wear-and-tear.

The Asics HyperGel KAN was crafted to be true to size. Runners can purchase a pair with their usual sizing choices in mind. The available widths are D – Medium and B – Medium for men and women, respectively. The semi-curved shape of this shoe’s platform and the form-fitting design of the silhouette work together to provide an accommodating in-shoe experience.

A rubber compound covers the rest of the sole unit, protecting it from the abrasive nature of the surfaces. It also makes sure to provide traction.

Flex grooves and tread patterns help the forefoot section to bend. Such a construction energizes the toe-off phase of the gait cycle.

The HyperGEL™ makes up the midsole unit of the Asics HyperGel KAN. This proprietary technology is comprised of an eTPU platform that goes from the heel to the toe. The eTPU is injected with small pieces of GEL® shock-attenuators. The combination of these elements ensures springy performances and well-mitigated landings. In contrast, the Nike Zoom Strike 2—also a road shoe—uses an air-containing foam in its midsole.

The external portion of the Asics HyperGel KAN’s upper unit is made up of a knitted fabric, which has the look and structure of a sweater. The job of this textile is to provide flexible yet supportive coverage.

The Asics logo is emblazoned on the left and right sides of the upper. These printed add-ons are meant to help in keeping the foot in place while also heightening brand recognition.

There is no traditional tongue unit on this running shoe’s façade. Instead, the Mono-Sock® Fit System is in place. This feature is made up of a one-piece internal sleeve that hugs the foot and keeps it free of irritation.

An elastic opening wraps the lower portion of the leg, completing the upper unit’s purpose of offering a sock-like coverage.

Pull tabs are placed on the instep and the back of the shoe. These fabric loops help the runner in wearing and removing the Asics HyperGel KAN. The one on the left shoe has the Kanji ‘Mind’ welded on it, while the right on has the Kanji symbol for ‘Body.’

Comparison

Author
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Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com