Good to know

The low-top Adidas ZX 5000 sneakers are included in running-inspired sneakers. This model is offered in men’s sizing exclusively. It used the Torsion system inserted on its EVA midsole that provides stability and support. The Torsion system technology allows the front and rear parts of the foot to move and adapt independently, thus enabling underfoot stability. Built originally for long-distance running, this sneaker also has the Soft Cell cushioning technology.

Furthermore, Adidas used the lacing system that allows the wearers to adjust the fit according to their preferences. To enhance the lockdown feel, Adidas added a TPU heel cage.

The white/blue Adidas ZX 5000 features the OG style, which made this kick famous for the serious runners and sneaker fanatics. Its upper is dressed in white and blue hues to highlight further the technology utilized in this kick. 

The classic color palette is applied to the mesh and suede upper, heel cage, and 3-Stripe branding. The neon lace locks and the graphic in the insole flaunt commemorative branding of the Torsion’s 30th Anniversary. Also, Adidas gave the foam midsole a pop of color over its durable and reliable rubber outsole. 

The Adidas ZX 5000 OG looks fashionable on feet when paired with any street style attire. These are monochromatic tracksuits, jogger pants paired with parka jacket, or rolled up chinos with a plain t-shirt.

The Adidas ZX 5000 features a design that is faithful to the original model. This retro appeal makes it remarkable for many onlookers, especially those who enjoy a classic pair of sneakers. The upper of this sneaker displays the mesh and suede materials with TPU heel cage, covered in the OG colorway. 

To add a modern feel to this old school footwear, the brand added extra lace jewels that serve as lace locks. The insole, meanwhile, has the 30th Anniversary of the Torsion System graphics, creating a fresh detail to this classic footwear. The same commemorative design can also be spotted embroidered at the reverse part of the tongue.

Adidas initially launched the ZX 5000 shoes in the 80s as ultra-lightweight running footwear that used the Torsion system cushioning found on the heel and forefoot. The embossed heel cage located on the heel, meanwhile, provided added stability ad lockdown fit the wearer’s heel. The brand was able to re-release the ZX 5000 in countless of times, using different styles, versions, and hues. 

In 2019, to celebrate the 30th year of the Torsion technology, Adidas launched the “30 Years of Torsion” collection. This capsule consists of modernized classic silhouettes from the 80s initially designed for the serious runners. Included in this pack are the ZX 6000, ZX 7000, ZX 9000, and the ZX 5000. All these sneakers were re-launched in their OG color schemes. Furthermore, these sneakers have standard features: the Torsion System on the midsole with TPU arch that connects the forefoot and the heel. 

The Adidas ZX 5000 is the second silhouette to use the Torsion System technology. Because of its comfort and stability, the ZX 5000 easily turned as the favorite kick of runners back then. This re-released model that is covered with white mesh upper accented with blue hue all over. Unlike its predecessor, this updated version has the jewel lace locks and unique graphic branding found on the insole.

  • Trefoil logo can be observed on the tongue tags of the Adidas ZX 5000 '30th Anniversary of Torsion'.
  • This model has 3M detail on the heel tab for visibility.
  • The Adidas ZX 5000 was also used as a base model for several collaborations, such as with BAPE, Undefeated, and Colette.

Rankings

How Adidas ZX 5000 ranks compared to all other shoes
Bottom 34% sneakers
All sneakers
Bottom 28% Adidas sneakers
All Adidas sneakers
Bottom 33% low sneakers
All low sneakers

Popularity

The current trend of Adidas ZX 5000.
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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.