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The low-top Adidas X_PLR shoes is a unisex model presented in men's range. Women are advised to purchase 1.5 sizes down their usual shoe size. For example, if a lady's regular shoe size is 7, she is encouraged to grab size 5.5 in men's range. Adidas used the conventional lacing system on this model that gives an adjustable fit to its wearers.

Like most running-inspired sneakers, this model has a low cut silhouette to provide its wearers ample freedom on its ankle movement. Moreover, this sneaker uses the mesh and suede on its upper for ventilation and added reinforcement. The EVA midsole underneath provides lightweight cushioning for day-long comfort.

Offered in multiple colorways, the Adidas X_PLR S is another fashionable pair in the impressive running-inspired sneaker collection of Adidas. This kick uses the lightweight and breathable mesh upper reinforced with suede on the eyelet, heel tab, and on the tongue.

Adidas offers this sneaker in several colorways, such as core black/cloud white, grey/pink, core black/pink, cloud white/core black, and legacy green/core black. Sporting a look that is similar to the well-celebrated NMD silhouette, this kick will almost always elevate any everyday attire. Plain tattered denim jeans paired with oversized hoodies will give a relaxed getup. Meanwhile, a monochromatic tracksuit looks excellent when paired with the X_PLR S.

Most onlookers give the Adidas X_PLR S a second glance as it flaunts a look that is similar to the NMD. This model has a mesh upper with a noticeable heel tab, just like the NMDs. However, this kick does not have the midsole plug, which made NMD very popular, unique, and perceptible even from afar. 

To celebrate the rich heritage of Adidas, the brand has been nonstop in delivering fresh silhouettes stirred from its archives. Three Stripes started to venture into selling running-inspired casual footwear in the mid-2000s. One of the popular sneakers launched during that time was the Adidas NMD, which further helped boost the popularity of Adidas.

The Adidas NMD was unveiled in December 2015 that features the ultra-responsive Boost on its midsole and adaptive Primeknit on its upper. It was designed by Adidas VP for Global Design Nic Galway and shared that this silhouette is the company's way to merge the past, present, and future.

The NMD was stirred from various classic silhouettes, such as MicroPacer, Rising Star, and the Boston Super. Adidas took all the salient details from these archived silhouettes and fused with modern technologies creating stylish and versatile sneakers. 

                 The Birth of Adidas X_PLR

Since NMD was tagged as a bit pricey, Adidas unveiled a more affordable version dubbed as the X_PLR. This inexpensive version displays a look that resembles the NMD. Adidas removed all the top of the line technologies and replaced it with reasonably priced yet quality materials.

The Adidas X_PLR also gained popularity for its lightness and comfort without sacrificing the overall style. The Three Stripes launched another version of this and unveiled the Adidas X_PLR S. This version kept a few of NMD style, such as the synthetic leather heel patch, minimalist mesh upper, and welded 3-Stripe branding.

  • The Adidas X_PLR S has a durable rubber outsole that provides traction on various surfaces.
  • This pair's heel pull tab and the speed lacing system allows its users to quickly remove or put this pair on as fast as possible.

Rankings

How Adidas X_PLR S ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 22% sneakers
All sneakers
Top 27% Adidas sneakers
All Adidas sneakers
Top 22% low sneakers
All low sneakers

Popularity

The current trend of Adidas X_PLR S.
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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.