Who should buy the Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX

The Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX is a solid option if:

  • You are looking for a hiking companion that could bite various surfaces well to keep you safe from slippage. 
  • A shoe that would not weigh your feet down as you tackle different terrain is what you are after.
  • You are looking for a shoe that keeps the water out and keeps you dry during your hiking adventures.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Logo

Who should not buy the Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX

If you long to hike without interruptions, then the Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX might not be for you. One wearer attested that the shoelace of this Adidas shoe finds them too thin and “hard to keep tied.” Also, hikers who wish to have a shoe that is free from any form of discomfort might have to take this hiking boot off their list. A hiker mentioned that the rearfoot section of this shoe was "hard and digging" into his ankle. They might be better off with the Adidas Terrex Free Hiker Cold.RDY.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Not Buy

Updates to the Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX

As the direct successor to the Terrex Swift R2 Mid GTX, this boot-type R3 variant comes with welcome upgrades. These improvements are as follows:

  • A molded heel cup with external reinforcements for additional rearfoot support
  • A fuller-yet-flexible shaft for extra ankle security without dumbing down mobility
  • More aggressive and spaced apart lugs for better grip and slip resistance on loose soil and muddy terrain
  • A thinner outsole bed that promotes responsiveness underfoot

These upgrades, however, come with a couple of trade-offs:

  • A roughly 10-dollar price increase from its predecessor’s
  • Weightier by a hair compared with the Terrex Swift R2 Mid GTX

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Updates

A cozy cradle for the foot

According to numerous adventurers, the Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX is without a doubt pampering. One of them even said that it is quite comfy for trail running.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Comfort

Multi-terrain traction

It provides high adhesion on a variety of terrain, including wet concrete, say many of those who have tested it.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Outsole

The lightness of the Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX

At around 450 g per shoe, the Swift R3 Mid GTX is among the lightest hiking boots on the market.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Lightness

No water allowed

Like most Gore-Tex kicks, this boot from Adidas grants excellent moisture defenses in inclement conditions.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Waterproof

Sure and stable

The Swift R3 Mid GTX delivers more than enough surefootedness on rocky paths and uneven terrain.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Surefooted

Beautiful and pleasing

Trail-goers from both gender camps find this hiker very pleasing to the eye.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Style

Alternatives to the Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX

Adidas Terrex Trailmaker Mid GTX

If you want something more affordable and tailor-fitted for fast hikes, the Terrex Trailmaker Mid GTX is a great option. It is significantly lighter than the Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX (about 100 g less). This hiker, however, is more effective on level ground than on rugged terrain.

Adidas Terrex Free Hiker GTX

Are you looking for an Adidas boot that gives a generous helping of cushioning and rebound? If so, set your sights on the Terrex Free Hiker GTX. Engineered with Adidas’ Boost technology, this bad boy underscores protection underfoot and discourages injuries due to improperly dispersed shock. One caveat: It costs north of $200.

Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Mid GTX Alternative

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 16oz
Use: Day Hiking
Cut: Mid cut
Collection: Adidas Terrex
Features: Lightweight / Eco-friendly, Lace-to-toe / Orthotic friendly / Removable insole
Waterproofing: Waterproof
Width: Normal / Narrow, Normal

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and run all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyzes every detail of the shoes that you might buy.