Adidas Terrex Agravic review

I have run for years on different Adidas shoes. All of them purporting to be trail worthy, but somehow falling short. Is the Adidas Terrex Agravic 330 different? Let’s find out!

The running terrain

The terrain that I have used these on, has been varied. I’ve run muddy trails, sandy washed out areas, rolling single track, gravely draws, rocky peak summits, and snow packed trails. 

Backstory

I have run on various versions of the Adidas Kanadia trail shoes over the years. These shoes appear to have evolved into the Adidas Terrex Tracerocker.

These seem to be on the lower-mid spectrum of the Adidas trail line up. The more spec trail runners are the Terrex shoes with Ultraboost.

The Terrex Agravic 330 is the next evolution from the Agravic 310. I ran a portion of last year’s season on the Agravic 310 and can report that it is a solid shoe.

The addition of the Ultraboost and Continental outsole has propelled the Adidas line from a casual urban path cruiser to a legitimate trail contender.

Excellent durability on the sole and midsole, average on the upper

Over the years, I have made note of wear areas of shoes. Typically, they wear out in three areas: the uppers, the midsoles, and the outer sole.

Based on the current wear, I anticipate them holding up like their previous model. The Continental outsole wears evenly and the lugs don’t break off. 

The Ultraboost foam is phenomenal after an entire season of running as it still has bounce in both cold and hot running conditions.  In short, I am in love with Adidas Ultraboost in a trail running shoe.

The uppers are both good and bad. The good is that the extra layers of rubber over the mesh fabric provide a nice level of protection covering the heel, both sides of the inner and outer portion, and the toe.

The additional thick layer applied to the toe portion is very protective as I didn’t suffer any “black toes” from inevitable stubs. The bad part of the uppers is that they developed holes where the toe flexes by this rubber application.

Grippy even on wet rocks

The Continental rubber outsole performs very well in all conditions, and Continental claims that the rubber is 30% grippier. The rubber compound is similar to the rubber that they use in their mountain bike tires. I found the rubber to maintain its grip, even on wet rocks.

The lug depth, shape, and spacing performed very well holding on loose gravel, running both uphill and downhill. This design also did not hold mud, shedding it quickly. Not once did I slip, even on sketchy terrain. I noticed very little rolling resistance when running on hard pack. 

Narrow fit

This shoe is a bit narrower than others on the market. I have an average width foot, and they fit me fine. The toe box isn’t particularly square or roomy; however, I never felt that my toes were cramped; even on 20+ mile long runs.

Due to the construction of the rubber overlay on the mesh fabric upper, some calluses formed on the ball, big toe, and the little toe. This could be a combination of the upper, as well as the narrower fit.

Comfortable

I overpronate, and this shoe felt fairly neutral and did not cause ankle, knee, hip or back pain. The foam tongue did not breathe particularly well, but it didn’t cause undo chafing or discomfort. 

Design

The Terrex Agravic 330 comes in a variety of colors; mine is black with red and grey accents with the ubiquitous white Ultraboost above the sole. 

Heel-to-Toe Drop

The Terrex Agravic 330 has about 6mm drop. 

Outsole

The outsole is made from Continental rubber. Lugs on the shoes with lugs about 1/16 of an inch deep. These lugs are evenly spaced across the sole, and there isn’t anything that goes “into” the soles. All of the lugs are “on top” of the base rubber.

Upper

The upper are primarily made of mesh. This mesh is covered with medium thick rubber/plastic that protects sides, toe cap, a heel portion, as well as create the Adidas “three stripes” design.

Midsole

The midsole is constructed of Adidas Ultraboost, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), covered in part, with a dense foam portion that provides protection and stability. The midsole is about 1-inch at the heel and ⅝ of an inch at the ball of the foot. 

Insole

This shoe comes with a no-frills basic insole, with no additional arch support, and it is not Ortholite. 

Tongue

The tongue of the shoe is not connected by elastic, or other substructure to the body of the shoe. The tongue is constructed from foam, approximately ⅛ inch thick.

Laces

There is not anything unique or particularly special about the laces. The laces are on connected to the shoe via ⅜ of an inch wide nylon loops (four per side), and 1 eyelet at the top. 

Tip: see the best trail running shoes.

Rankings

How Adidas Terrex Agravic ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 46% Adidas running shoes
All Adidas running shoes
Top 48% neutral running shoes
All neutral running shoes

Popularity

The current trend of Adidas Terrex Agravic.
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Author
Timothy Ashford
Timothy Ashford

Hi, I’m Tim and I’m a Colorado ultra trail runner. As a true weekend warrior, I spend much of my free time logging training miles and challenging myself to reach the next level. When I’m not running in the Pikes Peak region, I love spending time with my amazing wife and three awesome sons.