Adidas Delpala: A canvas skate shoe wannabe 

Taking cues from its Adidas Skateboarding archive, the Three Stripes label comes up with the Adidas Delpala lifestyle kick keeping its silhouette low, casual, and stylish. You may sport this minimalist sneaker throughout the day for work and leisure. But it isn't structured to take on the street sport's abrasiveness like the Dennis Busenitz and Lucas Puig shoes.

Instead of a leather treatment typically found in most skate shoes, this sneaker comes in a clean and streamlined canvas finish. Like those hard-beaten skate sneakers, the Delpala is assembled with the following performance-oriented components. 

  • Moisture-wicking OrthoLite sockliner for underfoot comfort   
  • Reinforced toe bumper which helps delay any scuff signs 
  • Rubber foxing layer that puts a lot of life into the shoe 
  • A rubber sole with a grippy tread pattern

Similar silhouettes 

  • Adidas Matchcourt is one of the Three Stripes canvas skate kicks that offer a resemblance with the Delpala. Both are designed with a sticky rubber bottom, but the skate-specific Matchcourt offers extra protection by having a hard-wearing toe cap. 
  • Adidas Seeley is one of the minimalist skate sneakers by the Three Stripes, which comes in tons of colors. Like the Delpala, this shoe doesn’t have a padded collar. Some are made in canvas, while there are leather and nubuck options too.

Facts / Specs

Style: Sporty, Minimalist
Top: Low
Inspired from: Skate
Collection: Adidas Originals
Closure: Laces
Material: Canvas, Rubber Sole, Vulc Sole, EVA, OrthoLite / Fabric
Season: Spring, Summer

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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.